11.12.2005

I have discovered poetry! Always before, I thought poetry was stupid. It was too much work, and it wasn't fun to read. I had never lost myself in a poem like I do in books, and I thought it wasn't possible. But now I have read Renascence by Edna St. Vincent Millay and I have had somewhat of an epiphany. Who knew poetry could be so very beautiful? I suddenly understand - poetry is like distilled prose. It's can have all of the beauty and imagery and magic of prose without any of the mundane parts.

The problem is that my epiphany so far extends to only one poet. I'm afraid if I read anything else, it will be just as boring and hard and unmoving as always. Anyone have any suggestions?

Renascence

All I could see from where I stood
Was three long mountains and a wood;

I turned and looked another way,

And saw three islands in a bay.

So with my eyes I traced the line

Of the horizon, thin and fine,

Straight around till I was come

Back to where I'd started from;

And all I saw from where I stood

Was three long mountains and a wood.

Over these things I could not see;

These were the things that bounded me;


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3 comments:

Jill said...

I had a Millet poem on my blog a few weeks ago. You have good taste. Other favorites:

“the love song of j alfred prufrock” – t.s. eliot

"We Wear the Mask". Paul Laurence Dunbar

“Incident” Countee Cullen

“Richard Cory” Edwin Robinson

“mending wall” and “birches” – Robert frost

“Leaves of Grass” (first page is great) – Whitman

Jill said...

I was thinking that except for whitman and frost, my recommendations aren't happy poems. So I googled "happy poem" and I found the following. I like it a lot.

http://www.alsopreview.com/thepoets/grinnell/cghappy.htm

Steph said...

I like the 'happy poem' a lot. Thanks for sharing. I will look up the rest.

I just remembered - my great-grandfather loved poetry and especially Robert Frost, so my Mom taught me to recite "Walking Through the Woods on a Snowy Evening" when I was about three. I can still recite the entire poem, although I never actually considered the words until middle-school. How strange - thanks for reminding me! I will let you know how I find your suggestions. I have also bought a book of Sara Teasdale, and I will let you know about that also.